Archive for the ‘italian’ Category

Rezdôra Osteria Emiliana
Phone: +1 (646) 692-9090
Email: reservations@rezdora.nyc
Addr: 27 East 20th Street, New York, NY 10003
URL: https://rezdora.nyc

On various recent visits  of New York, I went back to Peter Luger, the one in Brooklyn, for my fix of North American steak. PL’s porterhouse steak continues to be the steak against which I judge all other North American steaks. Whether PL is touristy or not, I could not care less. What matters to me is the dazzling steak they keep delivering, tourists or not in sight.  I returned to another place that seems to have attracted its hordes of tourists as it is a legendary eatery: Junior’s in Brooklyn. Junior’s remains one of my preferred eateries in New York, eventhough their celebrated cheesecake is not my cup of tea. Other restaurants that I tried:  LeñaSpanish Diner (among  the most exciting Spanish-style eateries of NYC right now…I know, not a revelation given how weak Spanish food is in NYC, but those are good by NYC Spanish food standards at this moment) of famous  Chefs Ferran Adria, Albert Adria and  José Andrés . I tried  Sorbillo NYC (easily one of the finest Neapolitan style pizze in NYC – My honest suggestion  to  the food journalists who seem to overlook  this gem of a Pizzaria: stop comparing  apples to grapes, stop! stop! I mean, most of the crap    you write  about pizze in NYC is seriously nau·se·at·ing. You know nothing about Neapolitan pizza..your comparisons of   pizze in Italy vs pizze in the US are worrying  signs of your total ignorance of basic things such as the importance  of the geographical environment   in your assessment of the pizza you are reviewing and btw….most of you are reviewing pasta dishes at a  pizzeria…c’mon!!??  ). New York ‘s restaurant  scene continues to be genuinely world class.

This time, I paid a visit to Rezdôra. A local reliable and knowledgeable foodie in NYC did  inform me about the opening of  this small Italian restaurant in Flatiron.  According to the media, the  Chef of Rezdora is Chef Stefano Secchi, a Chef who has honed his skills at some serious venues in Italy such as 1 star Michelin All’Enoteca (Canale), Hosteria Giusti as well as  3 star Michelin Osteria Francescana (the latter two establishments are located in Modena), and that he is  inspired  by the food of  the region of Emilia-Romagna , which food has been aggressively marketed as Italy’s best (for more, on that, click here).

 

 

 

Food in Emilia-Romagna does benefit from its local stellar ingredients, but there are some limitations to what you can do with that sort of food, oceans away from where it originates: to start, egg-based pasta (which local diners in Emilia-Romagna are accustomed to) is obviously more expensive to make than flour-based pastas. And  North American palates may not appreciate the difference.

When I went to eat at Il luogo di Aimo e Nadia and  Dal Pescatore, I took the time to broaden my knowledge of the traditional cuisines of Northern Italy (food from Emilia-Romagna, Mantuan food, etc) and I recall that one of the tests I did was to see how my palate would appreciate the difference between their local egg-based pasta vs the flour-based ones we are used to outside of Italy. I do, when time permits, make my own pasta at home and have tried both versions. But a trained palate will not fail to notice that flour in Italy, their water, the flavour of the dazzling eggs found there — all of that is different from what you will find in North America. My palate found their egg-based pasta to be more exciting, flavour-wise, but I can’t imagine one single restaurant trying to import the water and eggs from Italy. It will go bankrupt. This applies to the superb vegetables of Italy. Consequently, I went to Rezdora with the expectation that they do as great as it is possible to make food of Emilia-Romagna in North America.

 

1-Tagliolini al ragu. As expected, the tagliolini having the right thin shape and the right texture to soak up the ragu. The ragu made of pork shoulder, mortadella, ground pork and prosciutto simmered with parmesan sachets for 8hrs and finished with Italian olive oil. As one should better know, the environment (water, soil, etc) plays a massive role in the taste of both your pasta and your ragu. Therefore if you expect this dish to taste/feel/smell exactly as in Northern Italy, you have skipped those basics of the science of food. That said, this was freshly made tagliolini  (which doneness I would have preferred al dente – it was served a bit beyond that stage), the taste and texture of the ragu  having proper depth (the rich flavour of the meat is adequate, the sauce timely reduced –  and you do not feel any excess of fat in the sauce, which is what you should be looking for), with perhaps a tendency to put a bit more salt than I would have loved — salt enhances flavour, indeed, but in this instance, it went past that stage and was almost on the verge of starting to diminish the flavour of the overall dish — but that can be easily fixed. I generally prefer when the ragu is made of beef, pancetta and veal, but this was still good.  7/10

 

2-« Grandmother walking through the forest in Emilia » is the name of a dish  that consists of cappelleti verdi (homemade spinach infused pasta) filled with roasted leeks, baby leeks on a bed of black mushroom puree. In the ‘poetic’ naming of that dish, you  can see the influence of one of their Chef’s mentor, namely Chef Massimo Bottura of 3 star Michelin Osteria Francescana in Modena – who loves giving poetic descriptions to some of his dishes. This showcased a fine deal of technical precision in shaping the texture of that pasta. Too bad green peas are not in season right now, as great quality peas would have paired so well with them and brighten that dish. 8/10

 

3-Pappardelle verde, spinach pasta with ragu di cinghiale (boar ragu) and porcini. The dense pasta is, as usual, always great for sauces, sticking properly to the boar ragu. The first two dishes are classics of the house. I purposely added this dish and the next one to my meal as they were fresh new additions to their menu. Some kitchen brigades are somehow more excited/motivated when cooking new food items. But in this instance, the motivation was the same whether the dish was one of their classics or a new addition. The same fine ragu as with the first dish was there, only it is made of boar this time. The pasta’s texture properly rendered. Good. 7/10

4-Dolce scherzetto, roasted squash raviolini, burro rosolato and amaretti crumbs. Freshly made pasta (the case of all their pasta), with fillings of roasted squash and mostarda (a condiment made of candied fruit and a mustard-flavoured syrup), coated in sage-flecked brown butter sauce. Dressed with amaretti crumbs. I had variations on this during my last foodie tour of Northern Italy. Was this a serious challenge to what I had in Northern Italy? Was this up there with what a nonna would do back in Emilia Romagna? If you ask yourself such questions then you did not understand the basics of the science of food: Not the same terroir, not the same soil, not the same water. So, forget that. Can’t compare. Even the amaretti crumbs, as fine as these stood, could not compare to the stellar amaretti crumbs you may stumble upon in some parts of Italy. And regarding any comparison to la nonna, well…last time the media checked, their Chef was a young gentleman. So, he can’t be and can’t beat la nonna, lol.  The taste was pleasant rather than dazzling, the expected sweetness (coming obviously from the squash, mostarda and the amaretti crumbs)  not overwhelming. 6/10

 

5.Torta Barozzi – Dense, flourless cake made of rich, dark chocolate. The original recipe from Vignola (outside of Modena) —you can still enjoy the original TB at Pasticceria Gollini — remains a secrete, but if you have tried it (I tried it during my last  visit in Northern Italy), it has hardly any sugar, which is one thing I loved with this one version they made at Rezdora (it tasted of dark chocolate, which it has to, rather than of added-sugar to dark chocolate). The pastry Chef made a rendition that is quite  close to some of the versions (there are  a few, though)  that you can find in Italy,  and served it the traditional way, which means  to serve this cake all on its own (without any adornment), and that is appreciated.  However, I would have preferred a consistency that is moist and tender inside the cake (it was a bit tough, at serving) as it is usually the case with most incarnations of this torta in Italy. 6/10

My hats off  to their marketing team as it is currently a hot ticket in NYC. Extremely popular, indeed.

 

The pasta dishes were fine, considering the reality  of pasta dishes made freshly oceans and continents away from Italy. The limitation being that the soil, the water, the produce cannot be the same as in Italy, therefore no miracle is possible.

To be accurate, there are not stellar produce everywhere in Italy. As an example, most of the food that you will eat in big cities like Milan or Rome will taste as generic as anywhere else across the globe. What is accurate is that the best produce of Italy is ages ahead of the best produce that you will find in North America.

The only thing I hope they do at Rezdora  is to lower a little bit the salt input on some of the pasta dishes, unless, of course, most of their patrons are happy with that. The food comes in small portions, and it is not cheap, therefore they won’t win any award for « best value », but few restaurants in NYC would win that one anyways. At least the food is of quality, the wine list is well thought, and the next paragraph shows that they do nice things that do escape many of their competitors.

Bottom line: I arrived 30 mins before the opening in order to snatch a seat (they allow some few walk-ins for the seating at the bar, but the wait can be long, therefore it is better to arrive 30 mins before the opening and line up) at their bar considering that it was hard to book a table. Since it was a bit cold, they came outside and served us some sparkling wine. And no, there was no poster-diner (food blogger or food journalist promoting the food industry) lining up outside. Therefore that was a genuine gesture which appeared even more special given their already established popularity  (there are eateries with a lot to prove and yet they would never do this). A rare occurrence in NYC’s dining scene. Then when the door opened at 5hPM, the staff lined up to welcome the guests. I sat at the bar and the perfect balance between being Pro and Cool continued to be the trending pattern. A fine restaurant and an attention to details that most would not bother covering. Overall ratings (Category: Italian in NYC)  7/10 Food; Service 9/10.

 

Since I am a passionate gourmand, people do, at times, ask me if I have any recommendation for books of recipes.

My relationship with recipes, in general, is a bit special: normally, I do not like following recipes because the person who wrote it, is …basically …conveying nothing to you, you the individual who will follow his recipe. You are replicating his recipe, but you have no clue of what the original dish tastes like, obviously. So what’s the point?? … unless all that matters to you is to craft something generic based on the idea of the recipe
of another person.

Personally, I prefer learning alongside those in the know. As an example, Haitian cuisine has been in my top tier favourite cuisines (in company of French, Indian, Chinese, Thai, Japanese, Italian and an array of African, Arabic and Mediterranean cuisines) of the past 25 years, and I was busier understanding its nuances under the guidance of Haitian Mamans and Papas rather than trying to cook it myself by following recipes.

Right now, my current sweet half is Haitian and happens to be a gifted home cook of the level of any talented professional Chef cooking Haitian food, and I am having fun replicating her recipes, but that is because she is there, and can confirm if the replicated recipe is faithful to the taste she is looking for in her own recipe. Not that I would not know that it is faithful to the original recipe, but it goes without saying that it is always better to have the creator of the original recipe having her saying on the replicated version of her recipe.

Now, I do also have couple of books of recipes at home. They are essentially books of this globe’s greatest Chefs and the reason I buy their books is because I have eaten their food before and I am therefore confident in replicating their recipes in a manner that can get closer to the original recipe.

That said, I do have a booklet of recipes that I do recommend to my friends, when they do ask me for a suggestion, and it is a book that I bought in Sicily  when I went there, years ago, in search of new culinary inspirations. The book is tiny (hence the mention of booklet instead of book …in my initial introduction of it), the recipes are exquisite and easy to follow (very basic recipes). Most  recipes are written in no more than 8 to 9 sentences, with the listing of ingredients superbly well located on the left side of the instructions. At the bottom of each recipe, there is a wine  pairing recommendation. Although the recipes are very simple, there is  still a mention of the level of difficulty of  every single recipe.  The book is Sicily’s favourite recipes from SIME BOOKS (pictured above). Be warned that there are many books with the title  Sicily’s favourite recipes. The one I am recommending is the one by SIME BOOKS. Oddly, they do not have that booklet anymore on their web site, but if you happen to be in Sicily (all bookstores had it when I was there) or can find it online, I do highly recommended it, if you are into Mediterranean food, obviously, and are looking for recipes that are very easy to follow. At the end of the booklet, they do recommend another book which title  is “Sicilia in cucina, the flavours of Sicily” (Edited by William Dello Russo) that they advertise as being an extended version of the booklet, but I do not know that book. The booklet, which  is also edited by that same  William Dello Russo, is a fun read with very pretty pictures. Easily one of the better  recipe booklets out there.

For online recipes, I recommend the recipes of Gordon Ramsay. I have never considered Gordon as great Chef, and you will never see me eating at any of his restaurants. However, when it comes to teaching people how to cook, I think he is hard to beat. He has plenty of recipes that you can find for free on youtube (loved his recipes on how to make a burger, or on how he makes his beef wellington ) and I think they are worthy of attention.

 

Marea, New York
Michelin stars: 2   — demoted to 1 star in the 2020 NYC michelin
Addr: 240 Central Park S., New York, NY 10019
URL: http://www.marea-nyc.com/index.php/
Phone:  212-582-5100
Type of cuisine: (Their contemporary version of)  Italian cuisine .

MAREA 01Widely known as one of NYC’s  best Italian restaurants, celebrated for its homemade handmade  pasta dishes (some of the best in the country, according to NSE  ) ,  Marea is situated in Manhattan. They offer what is  more accurately their contemporary take (refined,  small portions) on Italian cuisine, with combinations of ingredients that are not always traditionally Italian (cheese and seafood, to take an example) but the fundamentals of Italian cooking are never too far.

Marea does what it takes, in light of what we are accustomed to in North America…to deserve its accolades – nothing to fault here, not extravagant but tasteful contemporary interior,  great service.

 

What we ate:

3The trio of crudo (big eye tuna, long island fluke, pacific jack mackerel) ,  top quality raw ingredient.  they did  avoid the mistake of overseasoning them. 8/10

4 ZUPPA – almond and watercress soup, seppia, shrimp, roasted peppers. It had  everything a great soup needs: acidity, sweetness, texture, enticing flavors. Complex in a highly enjoyable way 8/10

2Gnochetti, ruby shrimp, chilies, rosemary. properly rendered consistency  (to the tooth) of the pasta , the chilies not too hot, which was a good idea as to add an extra layer of flavor without the distracting (unecessary) piquancy, the ruby shrimp not a serious challenger to some of the far more delicious shrimps of the mediterannea but the overall is tasty and well executed. I could not fault this dish, I could not fault one single dish of this entire meal, actually …BUT   in comparison to   other 2 Michelin star Italian meals that I had elsewhere a 7/10 would be a fair rating (what would it take to score this dish with a higher rating? A sauce that’s spectacular as I have enjoyed at plenty of other Italian restaurants. This one was great. Just not supremely delicious.

1 Tagliata – creekstone farms sirloin, bone marrow  panzanella, braised romaine. / the sirloin seasoned exquisitely,  their take on the bread and tomatoes panzanella salad a good idea …but time and again I could not stop thinking about how dazzling this entire meal would have been with produce as spectacular as what can sometimes be found in some parts of Italy (as an example, the amazing produce found at an Italian osteria like Osteria con cucina A Cantina de Mananan  in Corniglia …and there is even better than that in some  parts of Italy) . 7/10

 

5Polipo / octopus –  I had octopus a tad more remarkable than this (meaning with bolder maritime flavor) , in North America, but this was of really  good quality,  the seasoning enticing , it had an ideal chewy consistency (enough firmness to remind ourselves that this is octopus, and not a jellyfish but also  tender enough for proper enjoyable chew).   7.5 /10

 

6PANNA COTTA  – sicilian pistachio panna cotta, raspberry , rhubarb rose granita as well as a bit of  aniseed. This was fine, rather than dazzling, panaccotta (had the pistachio flavor been more expressive and the taste a tad richer, I would call it “dazzling” instead of “fine…BUT expressive pistacchio flavor would clash with flavors of raspberry and rose granita…so instead of the pistachio flavor, use something else that you can easily pair with the rest ).  Still …, a fair 7/10

7SORBETTI blood peach, apricot, strawberry balsamic – Sorbetti were excellent even by fine sorbetti  standards in Italy. The suggestion that sorbetti are better in Italy is oftently a fabrication of the mind. In North America, there are sorbetti  that are as good and this is one perfect example of just that  9/10

 

PROS: Marea does what it takes, in light of what we are accustomed to in North America…to deserve its accolades – nothing to fault here, not extravagant but tasteful contemporary interior,  great service.

CONS: However great the ingredients  – and great  they are at Marea (by North American standards),  it would take the finer ingredients of some parts of Italy ………AND  a  sense to make food taste extraordinary for me to understand the shower of raves on Marea.

Overall food rating:  An 8/10 by  the standards of  Contemporary Italian cuisine in North America  ..SO NOT  to be compared to my ratings of places like, to take an example,  Il Luogo di Aimo e Nadia in Milan —  a two star Michelin too —  which would, with no doubt  be a 10/10 in my books if it was in NYC.  We are in a completely different set of expectations …) – But a 7/10 when I compare it to the 2 Michelin star Italian food I had elsewhere (Michelin star is international, so I believe that is fair to also assess Marea against the 2 star Michelin food found outside of North America ).   I am ignorant about many cuisines (Brazilian, Romanian, etc) , but Italian, French, most African / Asian /Carribean cuisines are food that I have patiently mastered/familiarized myself with and cooked for decades.  By familiarizing myself with I mean …learning from those in the know, the Moms and Pops and NOT by watching food shows on TV or following recipes 0n the web. So, I know what I need to expect from such food. From Italian food, I expect the most (perfecting the simple texture of your pasta or risotto, pulling off superb flavors  ) from the least (simple/ classic combinations of  ingredients).  Of this lunch at Marea, I saw no evidence of perfected textures and the sort of dazzling flavors I came to expect, at times,  from some other 2 star Michelin offering Italian food, but   there was nothing to fault neither, and the food is certainly really good by  Italian upmarket restaurant standards in North America, though, not peerless by those same standards —).

 

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CEFALUCefalu (Sicily) is a  picturesque  tiny seaside Mediterranean city of the kind that you would expect to see  in movies. Very easy on the eyes, it certainly won’t be hard, for the most, to fall for this place. It takes 1 hr by train (it costs €5 one way) to get there from Palermo.

CEFALU2In Cefalu, I ate at Al vicoletto (Addr: Via Madonna degli Angeli, 12 Piazza Duomo – Cefalu Phone: 0921 420971) , where I picked a risotto alla marinara (mussels, clams, squid, shrimp, parsley — the fresh maritime flavor of the seafood was not muted)  as well as a cold couscous made of olives and tomatoes (enticing fresh lemony acidity).

My verdict (Very good>Good>Ok>Bad): Ok. Honest casual food. Fine ingredient by the standards of the seafood that I kept finding in Palermo and its surroundings at most of their casual restaurants (not that bad, but not that impressive ..neither,  to tell you the truth). As ever, food this simple can always be bettered by spectacular ingredients and/or a touch of genius cooking at surprising the palate, which was not the case here, but  such features are rare across the globe.

PALERMO1Completing this short trip to Italy with few days in Sicily. Palermo did not knock my socks off, I will admit, but there is no doubt that Sicily is one of the jewels of the Mediterranea. My recommendation: if this matters to you, hire a car and tour the entire island of Sicily, do not stick just to Palermo.

PALERMO2Al cancelletto verde (Addr: Via Riccardo Wagner, 14, 90139 Palermo  Phone:091 320537) is opened since 1954, so one of the old restaurants of downtown Palermo (not far from the harbour). Bucatini with Sardines (the first  pic) was properly done (the pasta not as firmly aldente as so oftently found in Rome, but firm enough for proper chew, the sardine of fine quality). Grilled trout and squid was also another dish that was done as it should, meaning with respect to how Sicilian do traditionally  season their grilled seafood and the cooking  (temperature of the sea food, doneness, timing) without reproach.

My verdict (Very good > Good > Ok> Bad): Ok. Food this simple can always be bettered with a touch of bold seasoning, or whatever surprising effect/personal twist the Chef may deem interesting to throw in, and that was not the case, here. But that is not a fault, neither, as their intent was not to add a twist to the original recipes. Here, they keep the recipes as authentic as it is, so this is not food that is trying to wow, rather food that is done as it has always been. And it is done properly.  Excited, I was not, but you are warned (1)  many items of Sicilian cuisine  — I have the same issue with Roman cooking — are not my cup of tea for reasons that have nothing to do with what is  good or   bad. As an example, I can’t appreciate stuffed seafood …. which Sicilians do and which was served to me during this meal in the form of stuffed squid. Does that mean stuffed seafood is bad? I do not think so.  Just not what I prefer. (2) People who were raised by the sea (my case) oftently tend to  have an almost intimate preference for the types of fish they grew up with. In my case, trout is not one of them.

GIOLITTI1Last, but not least, a must-try in Rome: Giolitti. For those in the know,  Giolitti  is widely known as Rome’s ice cream shop to beat. On the day of my visit, there were even special tourist  tours focusing on  Giolitti.

GIOLITTI2Such fame tend to influence people, polarizing their opinions between instant haters (oh nah..another touristicky place) or lovers (oh yeah, it is the best ice cream of my life). I can only trade in facts that my palate is aware of, so I had no particular expectations. I just wanted their ice cream to be a technically well made ice cream, basta! And perfectly made it was, indeed, with a depth of  fresh milky taste (Never mind the flavors: whether the flavor of my ice cream  was pear or vanilla or something else, I believe that is not important — what matters to me is the technique, the depth in the work of the flavors) that is way more refined than at most of the other major ice cream spots of Rome.

Can it get any better than this? Was this my lifetime best ice cream? Remember, this …as excellent as it is …caters to the mass. So, ultimately, I had better ice cream (bolder milky flavor, bolder fruity flavor) done by talented ppl in their homes. But for ice cream catering to the masses, Giolitti’s certainly  one fine example. Giolitti  Addr: Via Uffici del Vicario, 40 – Roma – Tel 06.6991243  http://www.giolitti.it/

Untitled3Really good pizze at Ciampini Bistro (Addr: Via della Fontanella di Borghese, 59, 00186 Roma Phone: 06 6813 5108 http://www.ciampini.com/en ) , with beautifully conceived  thin crust (soft) as well as ingredients of fine quality. The 4 cheeses Pizza being one of the finest in Rome. I went on a different day and tried other very simple trattoria items (chicken . It is situated in a very  touristicky area of  Rome (the Spanish steps), but this is not a place that is just taking avantage of the hordes of tourists passing by. At what it does (simple trattoria fares), it is doing a serious job. Not exceptional, and this is food that  tastes  similar to what you will get in any  good trattoria in America (…..thanks to the theme of the “globalization”, a magical theme denying any suprise effect to our  palates because food had to taste the same wherever you go — by magical, I hope you understood that I was sarcastic) but certainly fine.

My verdict (Very good>Good>OK>Bad): Good – Can’t go wrong here. Basic trattoria food,indeed, but well made.  Excellent service.

Untitled2While visiting Tivoli, I rushed on the web to find suggestions about where to grab a bite in the area and was disappointed  by the reviews: they sounded completely out of touch with what needs to be expected from such area. It is a touristicky area, miles away from Rome and I am not too sure why one would expect galactic culinary exploits from such humble eatery.  Anyways, on the back of the realistic expectations that happened to me mine……………., I found  Bar Villa D’Este to deliver some honest tasty food.  There was not a vast quantity of  beer, but the beer tasted fresh, which is perhaps what one should expect from any place,  but many touristicky eateries do offer cheap quality beers (Montreal does actually excel at that!). Then my Ravioli di ricotta al ragu was certainly not homemade ravioli,  its texture not of the refined type, but again…………………save for some  high-end restaurants and   few artisan Chef trattorias outside of Western big cities, who the hell is making homemade ravioli nowadays?? At least, theirs tasted good. My only serious quip is that they should STOP USING  plastic ustensils………SUBITO!!!!! There are lots of things that I can tolerate, but that …. I CANNOT!!!!  Bar Villa D’Este – Addr: Via Tiburtina Valeria, 330, 00011, Tivoli, Italy Phone: +39 0774 3883
Verdict (Very good>Good>Ok>bad): ……………… I won’t assess this eatery for the sake of……. accuracy. I do not want you to compare my rating of this eatery to the ones of my recent meals. Why? Because Bar Villa D’Este does not have the pretention of competing with a place like, say, Vecchia Roma..obviously!!!! It is just a humble eatery to grab some nice fresh  beer and have some decent food. And yet, compared to its direct competitition….it is doing a DAMN HONEST JOB!

UntitledBaia Chia was recommended to me by the same folks who did suggest that I eat at Vecchia Roma. VR was an instant success, for me, but BC, although using nice ingredients by western restaurant trattoria standards …. and specializing in food that I am partial to (seafood)…delivered a meal that I won’t be able to rate (as explained below) – Scampi risotto was  as all’onda as it is possible to  be, the scampi of good quality, the taste delicious enough  but lacking the depth / complexity of a great  seafood risotto (this was good, just not great — the sort of white wine as well as seafood stock used makes a big difference, and it is  that difference that I was missing ). A seafood platter of grilled seafood featured good quality scampi, shrimp and  and calamari, the maritime aromas in evidence. Simple, as expected  but certainly effective though nowhere as dazzling as its better examples. Baia Chia Via Macchiavelli 5A Phone: 06 70.45.34.52

Verdict (Very good>Good>Ok>bad): ………………There is no denying the fact that Baia Chia uses fine produce (BY WESTERN TRATTORIA STANDARDS), service is great, food tasty enough. But I was not floored, for reasons…that have nothing to do with them: when it comes to seafood, my point of reference is the seafood from the Indian Ocean and/or the Caribbean . My palate perceives them as way superior than the seafood found elsewhere.  BC’s seafood is good, but I made the mistake of having that point of reference in mind. It diminished the appreciation of my mean, so I can’t rate this ..l.

Pursuing with further  accounts of my trattoria meals in Rome:

Angeletto Ai MuseiL’Angelo ai musei – flawless  pennette with pink salmon, with an osso bucco that was technically executed as it should, but that still left me perplexed as explained below.

Verdict (Benchmark>Excellent>Very good>Good>Ok>bad): Ok ++. This was some tasty classic Italian food, but I would need a second visit here to better assess this place since the sauce of that  good osso bucco had..somehow…a funky taste. Not too sure what the problem was… Furthermore, the house wine was really bad and that is hard to forgive in Italy. Sorry Angelo, but ….non posso perdonarti per quello!  L’Angelo ai musei, Rome  Addr: Via Leone IV, 2, Roma Phone: 06 3972 3187 URL: http://www.angolettoaimusei.com/

Couple of days in Rome. A quick account of my meals at  some of their humble trattorias:

TEMPIO DI MECENATETempio di Mecenate, L.go Leopardi 14/18 Phone: 06 4872653 http://www.tempiodimecenate.it : Food would  have impressed a bit more had my plate of grilled seafood expressed a certain degree of  maritime flavor both to the smell and on the palate (they just lacked salinity), their quality perfectly fine  for this standard of eatery.  A dish of ravioli as well as roman oxtail stew were not going to be remembered as ranking among the ravioli and roman oxtails that knocked my socks off , but  both were tasty, for sure, and   technically executed properly. Perhaps not in my top tier trattoria food items during this visit of Rome, but this was a  pleasant meal   and on this  visit, there were plenty of Italians of different generations eating there, which I guess is not a bad thing at all. Verdict (Very good>Good>Ok>bad): Ok

MARGHERITAEqually pleasant without standing out was the nearby Il Pasticciaccio (Via Merulana, 34, 00185 Roma, Italia Phone: Phone: 0689528967) . On one visit, I had couple of pizze here of which my sole reproach would be that  the crust needed to be softer.  The rest (cheese, tomato sauce) was fine enough/ Ok / normal  even by the standard of your average pizza in North America.  I will admit that  what I was missing the most was the flavor of a wood fired pizza, and dreaming of Neapolitan pizza  was not helping at all , but that is obviously not the fault of Il Pasticciaccio. After all, it is not as if I did not know what were the best pizze of Rome (Sforno,  ).  The service is good, and on the first evening I was there,  they even had  one young Italian lady who was able  to converse in English. If you go there, try the dishes featuring  grilled meats (chicken, beef) as the people who were eating at the neighboring table  seemed to have liked  their grilled meats. Again, nothing out of the ordinary of this kind of casual restaurant, but not bad at all neither. Verdict (Very good>Good>Ok>bad): Ok