Posts Tagged ‘meat’

Restaurant: Dons de la Nature
Address: 104-0061 Tokyo, Chūō, Ginza, 1 Chome−7−6, B1F
Phone:+81 3-3563-4129
Cusine: Steakhouse (serving only one type of meat: Purebred Wagyu)
Date/Time of the meal: 19-11-2014 18:00
Michelin stars: 1
URL: http://dons-nature.jp/

DLN is widely considered as a top tier steakhouse in Tokyo. Service (by the wife of the Chef)  was uneven for a 1 star Michelin restaurant: over-the-board friendly with some diners, decent with others…which, I gather, is ‘normal’  in ‘general life’ as this boils down to chemistry between people..less so  by the standards of  a 1 star Michelin restaurant. That said,  rest assured that the service is still really really good (you are in Japan, after all). The quality of the meat is the main reason that brought me here, and there is no denying it: the quality is, as expected, of top shelf mention. Sadly,  Wagyu is overrated, which is not the fault of DLN, indeed, but DLN …as a steakhouse…needs to pair  better red wine to their steak.  

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Dons de la Nature is widely considered  as one of Tokyo’s finest steakhouses. Which means that, here, you are exempt from the laughable mis-identification of the meat, a sad recurrent feature  at plenty of steakhouses around the globe. At Dons de la Nature, when they tell you they have Kobe beef, then it is the real one that  comes from Kobe in Japan (and not from elsewhere),  and when they say Wagyu,  then it is TRUE PUREBRED Japanese beef and they will tell you from what region in Japan.

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Traceability is taken seriously here. Wagyu beef is  usually (usually, I wrote, not always) fed on rice straw which is essential for achieving the high level of  intramuscular fat as well as whitening the marbled fat. The slaughter occurs in between 23 to 28 months.

THE FOOD:

I took no starter, fearing that the steak would be filling.

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The meat  available on the day of my visit was  Wagyu from the Oki Islands, (there was a choice of a highly marbled sirloin,  as well as tenderloin — for my taste, Sirloin features the  characteristics I am looking for when eating Wagyu as it’s not lean like tenderloin, the flavor certainly more expressive compared to tenderloin).

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Oftently, in Tokyo, steaks are cooked on an iron griddle (teppanyaki), but here, at Dons de la Nature, they grill it over charcoal (my  preferred cooking method for steak), no ordinary charcoal that is (they use the highly praised Binchōtan charcoal) ,  inside a kiln.  From such steakhouse, there’s not much to say about the basics (as expected, they get the requested doneness right, medium-rare in this case, the seasoning, although simple — a bit of salt — is judicious, the nice crust on the outside that most steak aficionados favor nowadays is achieved beautifully , and the kitchen  clearly knows how to delicately handle a meat of such extensive fat marbling ),

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so what I was looking for was how far the extensive marbling could impress in flavor. Unexpectedly,  the umami  kick  that the  media and plenty of online accounts have praised  continues to elude me (this was the 3rd Wagyu tasting of this trip, having tried Matsusaka a day prior, then Sanda) .Well, YES the umami dimension is  definitely there (afterall the effect of the marbling has to be ultimately felt)  but I get more exciting umami flavor from most   40 to 45 days perfectly dry aged corn-finished prime Black Angus cuts …that have less marbling.  I also do not get the comparision to  foie gras (a common comparison) that I oftently hear about. Do not get me wrong:  this is   quality red meat, that is for sure,  the fat much more delicate in taste and texture in comparison to a fatty cut of Black Angus, but at the end of the count …it is just not as flavorful.   I admire the  quality of Wagyu beef, but for the enjoyment part ..nah,sorry…I (my palate) just do not get it. This was a  6/10, at best, for me  (Grade: A5/  Breed: Japanese Black Wagyu from Oki Islands, 30 days of wet aging  + 30 other days of dry aging )

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The Chef’s wife has suggested to pair the steak with a glass of Camus Père & Fils Mazoyères-Chambertin Grand Cru 2001. This is a wine that scores high on paper: exceptional soil, exceptional vintage, too, as 2001 is one of the very best years of Mazoyères-Chambertin wine.  But the wine I was having had barely any structure (surprising for a wine known for its complexity), the wine devoid of the mouthfeel expected from a grand cru, the finish disappointingly short. Furthermore, this glass of wine was so dry that it clashed with the flavor of the meat I was having. Dryness is a characteristic of Mazoyères-Chambertin wine, but but this was way too dry to be enjoyable. This is an instance where you need a wine with silkier tannins/rounder palate.

Pros:  Wagyu is so praised outside of Japan that there are no shortage of marketing manipulations to call pretty much everything that looks like meat… Wagyu.  You therefore really appreciate the moment when you get to enjoy the real thing on its very own land, which is exactly what Dons de la Nature offers.

Cons:   Wine pairing to a steak is expected to be a highlight at a steakhouse. It has to.

 

Service: Very intimate, very very friendly. The wife of the Chef (she was the sole waitress on that evening) is very enthusiastic, perhaps more with some than  others, but I am nitpicking here. It is much more informal than at most of the steakhouses that I have been to.

My verdict and conclusion:  I won’t rate this house as I do not want my aversion to Wagyu to influence my opinion about Dons de la Nature.  But Wagyu, you my friend….even at the same cost as my favourite Black Angus steaks, there is simply no way I could appreciate you. I respect your legendary reputation but for me, it is clear  that your scarcity creates your value. Yes, you are beautiful to espy (I have rarely seen marbling of such striking beauty), but for my palate, you are not even half as flavorful as an expertly dry aged prime cut of Black Angus. And I just gave you 3 chances right here on your own lands! I even  ensured to lower my expectations (I had none, to tell you the truth) and I did erase  any notion of price from the equation so that the assessment’s  focus is on what matters most:  the flavor!!!.

What I think weeks later: That Wagyu is my all-time biggest disappointment on the aspect of food, that is life and I can deal with that. What struck me most was how the praises about its superlative flavor had absolutely nothing to do with what I have enjoyed. If the flavor of meat is going to be almost as subtle as the one of tofu….then I’ll take the tofu! Meat needs to be flavorful no matter how hard you have worked its quality.

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Kitchen Galerie
Dinner on Saturday Aug 24th 2013, 19:00
Type of Cuisine: North American, Market Cuisine Bistro
Type of place:  feels homey, not fancy
60 Rue Jean-Talon Est, Montreal, QC
(514) 315-8994
URL: http://www.kitchengalerie.com/

In Montreal, there are hundreds  of bistrots. But few do really count among my favourite (the ones  I feel comfortable to  submit in my top tier). There are actually 5 or 6 that I would really consider in my  top tier, no more. Kitchen Galerie on Jean Talon (not to be confused with their sister bistrot, Kitchen Galerie Poisson, that I visited once and did  not like at all) is among those few ones, and in its prime, it has proven to be a benchmark bistrot by  Montreal standards. On lesser impressive meals (all our favourite places have ups and downs), it still remained one of the good  bistrots of Montreal.

When my wife and I do go there, we usually take the cote de boeuf for two, a generous meaty marvel that could easily feed 3 persons. But we are getting old and our body is not able anymore to coop with that beast, lol. Still, easily among the tastiest, if not the tastiest cote de boeuf for two you’ll find in Montreal. Of course, the quality of the meat plays a great role here, but there’s more:  they simply seem to have plenty of fun doing that cote de boeuf and the savourishness, joyous flavors of that dish have been remarkable.

The best meal we had at KG was the very first one. Dish after dish, they kept delivering bistrots fares of uncommon deliciousness. It remains, years later, the meal by which I judge all other bistrots meals in Montreal.

Susbsequent meals were fine, just not as stunning as that first one. One great mistery has been the ‘Foie Gras Poélé, Tarte tatin aux pommes, Sauce Caramel”. The first time I had it at KG on Jean Talon, I would look straight in your eyes and elect that version as one of this globe’s finest bistrot items. I do not take that kind of risk on  superlatives  for the sake of trying to sound sensational,   if I am confident with such bold statement that is because it was simply that stunning.  Even the devil would not have enough arguments to convince me of the opposite. But I have never re-experienced that marvel, its other versions happened to  just be Ok  (the sweetness less sensational, the tarte tartin simply less fruity) . And yet I never lost faith in  KG on Jean Talon as  a top Montrealer bistrot.

This evening, both my wife and I sat at their  counter ,  and decided to give another chance to the ‘Foie Gras Poélé, Tarte tatin aux pommes, Sauce Caramel”.  For some reason, my wife was very happy with the dish –probably because she is more interested by th efoie gras, which was great, rather than the tarte tatin — , while I was torn in between the successful piece of fresh foie gras (8/10 – the sear perfect, the deep livery mouthfeel exciting; if you think that such easy item can’t be faulted, think twice: many, many..even among this globe’s most ambitious dining destinations, seem to not be always capable to pull off such exciting piece of foie gras, perhaps because it’s not the kind of details that the most look for…as some would say: foie gras is foie gras, lol.  Not my case, I want my foie gras to have perfect caramelization, the deep livery flavor exciting) and the tarte tatin (0/10 – what happened to the once startling tarte tartin?? On this evening, it was tiny in  size and incredibly dry ).

Then my wife picked a salmon tartare. Delicious in mouth, with judicious seasoning, the kick of acidity really well balanced. The accompanied salad vibrant in mouth. Easy easy bistrot fare and yet I always wonder how come many bistrots have hard time getting it this right?? Lol. 8/10

For me, a dish of roasted beef filet with roasted  potatoes. Again, spot on seasoning and exciting mouthfeel. All things you would expect from such simple bistrot fare, but they  make it happen where many  are debating about it. One thing though: I’d appreciate a bit more potatoes, and I’d add  some carrots or other root vegetables.   8/10

For dessert, I do not expect miracles in bistrots. If bistrots in France are not always able to pull off startling French desserts, I dont see why I should expect the moon from desserts at a North American bistrot. And yet, they are doing things the way I was taught to cook, which naturally means the way I appreciate: a simple crème brulée was not going to be served without Chef Axel verifying how it was done by the trainee who made it . I think even the trainee was surprised: when was the last time you saw a Chef bothering about an item as simple as a crème brulée?? When?? For sure, this is not the type  of things that will wow the most, and I do understand that, but for me that is what REAL cooking should always be about: the little details!!  The crème brulée, excellent (the custard well done, its consistency lusciously rendered avoiding the overly rich/thick disgusting heavy creamy feel that some try to sometimes sell as authentic just because they can’t make a proper one).

Less successful was the eclair, which was not  startling, not bad neither. But again, it is a bistrot, not a pastry shop

Pros:  If you are going to throw that kind of simple but well executed delicious food, of course I’ll fall for you.

Cons:  Hey..what is happening to the tarte tatin, Lol?? Folks…I don’t get that one, Rfaol!!!!

My overall score for this meal: 8/10 for this type  (traditional/rustic but somehow with a modern touch ) North American bistrot (by  Montreal standards).  Simple bistrot fare, so it’s easy to overlook the little details that make things great, but that is where KG shines: they somehow manage to make the little things that many fail to notice…GREAT. And that is why KG is still a favourite for me.  As long as they have trainees / new cooks who understand that principle, this will remain one of Montreal finest bistrots. I was also impressed to see those young trainees doing exciting versions of mom-and -pop sauces. Such young souls  …being able to replicate the authentic joyous flavors of the past in an improved way —that is to me, an achievement! And there was more on this evening:  they had a take of the duck confit that looked/smelled (I did not taste it, it  was served to the gentleman seating next to me ) like what I wish many  French bistrots in France will start understanding: a great duck confit can keep its traditional spirit and yet be exciting at touch/smell/ looks (I have no doubt the taste followed, given the joyous flavours found on the dishes I have sampled ) …. It does not  need to be dry and tasteless in order to be authentic!!!!!!!!!!!

Conclusion: Eventhough I have not re-experienced the ‘magic’ of that stunning first meal, KG (the one on Jean Talon) continues to deserve its position in the top tier of Montreal bistrots.  Some restaurants master the art of going  from hero to zero simply  because they are managed by people who are not capable of  being reliable. That is not the case of KG and it is easy to see why:  Chefs Axel and Mathieu Bourdages are working hard in their kitchen, instead of parading on TV, and they are doing it with pride and fun. No shortcuts are taken.  KG has proven one more time that a team that’s talented and having fun together will always prevail against the drawbacks of success (lack of consistency, etc ). They are consistent, their deserved  success never got to their head, and their food tastes good. The D in Delicious!